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Thread: Single-function inkjet printer recommendations wanted

  1. #1
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    Default Single-function inkjet printer recommendations wanted

    Looking for suggestions of brand/model number of single function color inkjet printer. My requirements are:
    1. No wireless (i.e. wi-fi, bluetooth, etc.) machines.
    2. Must 'just work' with Linux.
    3. Must use separate color ink cartridges, where each color can be individually replaced.
    4. Have above average print quality for graphics.
    If anyone knows of such a critter, please let me know.

  2. #2
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    Take a look at this url: use separate color ink cartridges https://www.google.com/search?q=inkj...hrome&ie=UTF-8

    The second listing is a Consumer Reports listing, about 5 pages long. I will look at it later and comment back. Never looked for a printer with separate cartridges -- does not mean it does not exist. More comments later ! !
    Last edited by zburns; 06-29-2013 at 09:16 PM.

  3. #3
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    Hi Senaeus, welcome to the MySuperPC forums:

    I found this Canon product, PIXMA PRO-1 Photo Inkjet Printers, at this url: http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/profes...pro_1#Overview

    It requires 'separate' 12 individual color cartridges. Just read thru the website and you will see plenty of data. If you go to Specifications, you should get all the 'detailed spec data' without any of the so called 'sales features'. The 'specifications' should explain 'specifically' exactly what the printer will do. They clearly spell out the 12 separate color features.

    Also, in the first paragraph, first sentence, on the first page (that google takes you to ) labeled 'OVERVIEW', you will see a reference to a Canon EOS Digital SLR. I would think that this reference implies that this printer will do a excellent job of transforming the digital image from this Canon camera to a reasonably decent color print. Whether the printer will do the best possible job on a 25 megapixel Nikon/lens combo (or a equivalent Canon, which I assume is available), I have no way of knowing. A conversation directly with Canon could perhaps clear up the relationship of maximum printer capability to max camera resolution (max camera resolution is dependent on lens resolution capability -- for the camera/lens being used).

    Interesting point is that the very expensive cameras/lens combinations will require an 'equivalent high resolution color printer' and one would expect such a printer to be relatively expensive.
    --------------
    A footnote. Very fine 35 mm cameras do go up to 25 (maybe even 30) megapixels. To make use of the resolution capability of the camera, I assume the lens being used must have a maximum resolution capability equal to that of the camera. Then if the digital data (for 25 or 30 megapixels) is to be printed, the 'digital printer' must also have that same or better 'printing resolution capability'.
    Last edited by zburns; 06-30-2013 at 03:14 PM.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by zburns View Post
    Hi Senaeus, welcome to the MySuperPC forums:

    I found this Canon product, PIXMA PRO-1 Photo Inkjet Printers, at this url: http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/profes...pro_1#Overview

    It requires 'separate' 12 individual color cartridges. Just read thru the website and you will see plenty of data. If you go to Specifications, you should get all the 'detailed spec data' without any of the so called 'sales features'. The 'specifications' should explain 'specifically' exactly what the printer will do. They clearly spell out the 12 separate color features.

    Also, in the first paragraph, first sentence, on the first page (that google takes you to ) labeled 'OVERVIEW', you will see a reference to a Canon EOS Digital SLR. I would think that this reference implies that this printer will do a excellent job of transforming the digital image from this Canon camera to a reasonably decent color print. Whether the printer will do the best possible job on a 25 megapixel Nikon/lens combo (or a equivalent Canon, which I assume is available), I have no way of knowing. A conversation directly with Canon could perhaps clear up the relationship of maximum printer capability to max camera resolution (max camera resolution is dependent on lens resolution capability -- for the camera/lens being used).

    Interesting point is that the very expensive cameras/lens combinations will require an 'equivalent high resolution color printer' and one would expect such a printer to be relatively expensive.
    --------------
    A footnote. Very fine 35 mm cameras do go up to 25 (maybe even 30) megapixels. To make use of the resolution capability of the camera, I assume the lens being used must have a maximum resolution capability equal to that of the camera. Then if the digital data (for 25 or 30 megapixels) is to be printed, the 'digital printer' must also have that same or better 'printing resolution capability'.
    Thanks for the link. Unfortunately the specs only mention Windows...are you sure it works with Linux? That is very necessary, as my goal is to eventually switch from XP Pro to Linux. It will be used for printing from internet (I don't fool with cameras).

  5. #5
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    From your post just above:
    . . . . . my goal is to eventually switch from XP Pro to Linux.
    I think you have to look at what your intentions are 'from a manufacturers perspective'. Take the Canon product above for example. It cost about $ 1000. When I looked for printers with 'individual' cartridges, this was the lowest price one I found, as I recall. But I also found other printers for single cartridges that were more expensive like in the several thousand price range.

    Take a look at this Wikipedia page entitled 'Linux kernel' : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux_kernel Look to the right at the Linux Penguin Box, and, specifically the following:

    (1) Latest stable release 3.10 (30 June 2013; 9 days ago) [±][2]

    (2) Latest unstable release 3.10-rc7 (22 June 2013; 17 days ago) [±][3]

    Evidently, some Linux software that was quite good, workable, etc. and some that had some 'unstable' problem (s).

    Linux is written thru a world wide co-op of individuals and developers, as best I can understand. I assume the software writers/developers do their best to be sure the software is compatible with existing hardware.

    My suggestion regards the Canon printer mentioned above is that you call Canon regarding their printer and get their explanation regards 'any guarantee' that their products will be guaranteed to work with Linux software.

    Bottom line is that the 'reverse' is probably true. I assume Linux must be 'so written' that it will work with any computer peripheral, but preferably 'definitely' written for computer peripherals that meet the ATX standard.

    Here is the url for the Canon printer I make reference to: http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/profes...Specifications

    OS Compatibility: Windows 8, Windows Vista®, Windows XP, Windows 7 .. and .. Mac OS® X v10.4.11 to v10.8.x6
    ------------
    It is fair to assume that both Microsoft and Mac rigidly adhere to a logical set of specifications anytime they release any document to the public.

    Any company or individual that writes software or manufacturers a 'computer product' for general consumption should always endeavor to know 'for a fact' that the ATX standard is met (general desktop, office, etc type computers). Computers for use by US Military have to meet 'military specifications'.

    Here is the url for the ATX specification: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux_kernel

    Take a look at this url for Contact Linux: https://www.google.com/search?q=Cont...hrome&ie=UTF-8

    Perhaps you can get a more definitive explanation from someone at one of these Linux contact numbers or addresses ! ! !

    Hope the above helps ! ! !
    ------------
    Last edited by zburns; 07-09-2013 at 01:51 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by zburns View Post
    From your post just above:

    I think you have to look at what your intentions are 'from a manufacturers perspective'. Take the Canon product above for example. It cost about $ 1000. When I looked for printers with 'individual' cartridges, this was the lowest price one I found, as I recall. But I also found other printers for single cartridges that were more expensive like in the several thousand price range.

    Take a look at this Wikipedia page entitled 'Linux kernel' : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux_kernel Look to the right at the Linux Penguin Box, and, specifically the following:

    (1) Latest stable release 3.10 (30 June 2013; 9 days ago) [±][2]

    (2) Latest unstable release 3.10-rc7 (22 June 2013; 17 days ago) [±][3]

    Evidently, some Linux software that was quite good, workable, etc. and some that had some 'unstable' problem (s).

    Linux is written thru a world wide co-op of individuals and developers, as best I can understand. I assume the software writers/developers do their best to be sure the software is compatible with existing hardware.

    My suggestion regards the Canon printer mentioned above is that you call Canon regarding their printer and get their explanation regards 'any guarantee' that their products will be guaranteed to work with Linux software.

    Bottom line is that the 'reverse' is probably true. I assume Linux must be 'so written' that it will work with any computer peripheral, but preferably 'definitely' written for computer peripherals that meet the ATX standard.

    Here is the url for the Canon printer I make reference to: http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/profes...Specifications

    OS Compatibility: Windows 8, Windows Vista®, Windows XP, Windows 7 .. and .. Mac OS® X v10.4.11 to v10.8.x6
    ------------
    It is fair to assume that both Microsoft and Mac rigidly adhere to a logical set of specifications anytime they release any document to the public.

    Any company or individual that writes software or manufacturers a 'computer product' for general consumption should always endeavor to know 'for a fact' that the ATX standard is met (general desktop, office, etc type computers). Computers for use by US Military have to meet 'military specifications'.

    Here is the url for the ATX specification: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux_kernel

    Take a look at this url for Contact Linux: https://www.google.com/search?q=Cont...hrome&ie=UTF-8

    Perhaps you can get a more definitive explanation from someone at one of these Linux contact numbers or addresses ! ! !

    Hope the above helps ! ! !
    ------------
    Thanks for all the info! Since first posting I've had time to research further. It appears all manufacturers have discontinued single-function printers for consumers, and now only offer them to businesses (at ludicrous prices).
    Fortunately, my build is legacy-focused, so this does not matter. Before the current multifunction craze, all or most consumer inkjets were single-function models, and its these I'm focused on, so if you ever run across any info on older inkjets having individual color cartridges, please let me know. Also, research now indicates that Epson and HP are the main Linux-friendly manufacturers of printers.

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