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Thread: Another fans only at boot.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    Default Another fans only at boot.

    I am in the process of building a Windows Home Server 2011 system. The components include those listed below.

    I have connected the following outside the case.

    Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core
    ASRock H77M-ITX Mini ITX LGA1155
    Corsair XMS3 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1333
    Western Digital 500 GB SATA II 7200 RPM 2.5"
    Lian-Li PC-Q08B Mini ITX Tower
    Corsair HX750W

    These are not connected as yet.


    HighPoint RocketRAID 2720SGL & Cables
    Seagate Barracuda 2TB SATA III 3.5" 7200RPM
    Seagate Barracuda 2TB SATA III 3.5" 7200RPM
    Seagate Barracuda 2TB SATA III 3.5" 7200RPM
    Seagate Barracuda 2TB SATA III 3.5" 7200RPM
    Seagate Barracuda 2TB SATA III 3.5" 7200RPM
    Seagate Barracuda 2TB SATA III 3.5" 7200RPM

    I have temporarily connected a monitor (DVI), KB and speakers. When I turn on the monitor, I get a "no connection" message on the screen. When I power up the system. The BIOs does not display on the screen nor are there any beeps from the speakers. The only thing tht happens in the fans on the CPU and case fans run and the case LED lights come on. I don't know how to trouble shoot the problem.

    There is a 4 pin conector labeled as "ATX 12V Power Connector" My PSU doesn't have a 4 pin 12 COnnector. However ASRock's FAQ page has the following comment:

    ASRock has its own design to omit the Intel specified 4-pin connector. All needed
    power for motherboard can be supplied from 20-pin ATX connector. So ASRock P4
    platform motherboards is able to support some power supplies without +12V 4-pin

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Georgia
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    Default

    All ATX psus have a 20 pin connector plus a 4 pin connector that will join up with the 20 pin making it a 24 pin connector. All ATX motherboards have a mating 24 pin female board connector on the motherboard.

    My opinion, serious mistake to assemble outside the case. You should be using a wrist strap with a multi megohm resistor in the wire that has an aligator clip to fasten to the case -- note, that this is a minimal form of static protection, but you should be using it; therefore, it is hard to do static control the way you are doing the assembly.

    Back to your 8 pin connector. Look closely at the plug and see if you cannot separate it into two 4 pin connectors. If you can separate the two plugs, give us a post back and I will take you to the next step; I want to locate the wiring configuration for the 4 pin plug -- I was looking at it several days ago. Hopefully, your not 'lighting up' is due to the cpu not having power. EDIT: By separate into two 4 pin plugs, the 8 pin plug is designed to come apart easily into two 4 pin -half plugs- each with +12 volts, or only one of them but I can probably find that out tonight.

    Back to the case, you would be better off to assemble into the case as in a 'normal build', just install one HD. You have to use static control, taking a chance not to use it.

    However ASRock's FAQ page has the following comment:
    I would ignore this for the moment. If AsRock was serious about this, there mobo manual or some doc or some label would say 'DO THIS' in big letters. Look for such a statement but it has to be in the right place. We see a lot of AsRock builds on this forum and I have not ever read 'this cpu power info' statement from any AsRock user.
    Last edited by zburns; 07-11-2012 at 07:19 PM.

  3. #3
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    Jul 2012
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    zburns, thanks for the response. I just got a reply frln AsRock and he said I need both the 24 pin and 4 pin connector. I ordered an ATX P4 4-pin 12V Power Connector to Molex Cable Adapter and hopefully that will solve the problem. When I saud it was assembled out the case, it was a bit misleading. It's a mini ITX case with little room and the case side doubles as the mounting platform for the mobo. If the case side is unscrewed, it can be laid on it's side with the cabling intact.

  4. #4
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    South Carolina
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    I thought Windows Home Server was dead.
    My Rig:
    Corsair Obsidian 450D | EVGA SuperNova G3 650W | Asus Prime Z270-A | Intel i7-7700K | Cryorig H7 | G.Skill TridentZ 16gb (2x8gb) DDR4 3200 | MSI GTX1070 Gaming X 8G | Crucial MX300 SSD | Windows 10 Pro 64-bit | Asus VW246H

  5. #5
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    MS will support WHS 2011 until 2025. I'll turn 89 in 2025. I'll probably not care by then. I found out about the MS announcement a couple days after my copy was delivered.

  6. #6
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    Jul 2012
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    My first build was in 1977 0r 1978. In those days a build consisted of soldering the chips onto PCBs, building the PSU, etc. The CPU was a Motorola 6800, 8 bit processor. The basic "kit" came with 4K of RAM that I upgraded to 32K. That was the max because the IO was memory mapped and started at the 32K boundary. At first SW and data were stored on a cassette tapes. A few months latter I bought an 8" floppy disk drive that set me back $1500 at a time when gasoline had just sky rocketed to $.50/gal. There was no OS, the few apps ran as stand alone programs. That were written in interpretive BASIC. I had a Xerox daisy wheel printer with a KB that I used as a terminal. Later I got a Adam-3 ASCII terminal. It displayed 80 char/line and no graphics.

    http://bit.ly/Jeb2XY
    Last edited by wjburl; 07-12-2012 at 10:11 AM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by wjburl View Post
    MS will support WHS 2011 until 2025. I'll turn 89 in 2025. I'll probably not care by then. I found out about the MS announcement a couple days after my copy was delivered.
    Aw, that stinks. I think I read somewhere that they're going to something like Windows Server Essentials or something like that, but it costs over $400.
    Plus, it seems that cloud backups have the potential to replace NAS systems in the near future. We'll see.
    Last edited by RickyTick; 07-12-2012 at 10:56 PM.
    My Rig:
    Corsair Obsidian 450D | EVGA SuperNova G3 650W | Asus Prime Z270-A | Intel i7-7700K | Cryorig H7 | G.Skill TridentZ 16gb (2x8gb) DDR4 3200 | MSI GTX1070 Gaming X 8G | Crucial MX300 SSD | Windows 10 Pro 64-bit | Asus VW246H

  8. #8
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    Jul 2012
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    I have a NAS and an old PogoPlug. I think that WHS is more flexible and will work better for me. I got the OS for about $50. Linux may be cheaper but a steeper learning curve.

  9. #9
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    Jul 2012
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    RTFM!!! The power supply had an 8-pin plug that made to break into 2 4-pin plugs. Made it to the BIOS. Now off to finish the job.

  10. #10
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    Jul 2012
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    Now I'm not sure where to post this question. Now that I've got it to boot into the BIOS, should I install WHS first and then the RAID Card and disks, or should I install the RAID Card first so that WHS can see it during the installation?

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