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Thread: clock speed vs cas latency

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    Little Elm, Texas, USA
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    14

    Default clock speed vs cas latency

    I am building a new rig.

    ASUS P8P67
    Intel i& 2600K
    Western Digital 2TB HD x2

    My question is what is the most important consideration when buying RAM. I am going to put in 4 4GB sticks of DDR3 made by Gskill from their Ripjaws lline. For maximum performance, which is more important, clock speed or cas latency? Specifically 2133 (PC3 17000) CL 11 or DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) CL 7? Thanks for the info.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    South Carolina
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    2,503

    Default

    All of the P8P67 boards run at default at 1600 (except for the P8P67-M). So unless you're planning on doing some over clocking, I would suggest going with DDR3 1600. The difference in these frequencies is very small and not noticeable in any meaningful way for most casual computer users. It's usually the power users and the hard core gamers that take advantage of the higher performance stuff.
    My Rig:
    Corsair Obsidian 450D | EVGA SuperNova G3 650W | Asus Prime Z270-A | Intel i7-7700K | Cryorig H7 | G.Skill TridentZ 16gb (2x8gb) DDR4 3200 | MSI GTX1070 Gaming X 8G | Crucial MX300 SSD | Windows 10 Pro 64-bit | Asus VW246H

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Spartanburg, SC
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    71

    Default

    I have some questions about SDRAM3 Cas latency and timings that aren't really answered to my satisfaction in any of the existing posts I've found about the topic, but I can't seem to find the "post a new thread" link.

    This forum was MOST helpful to me when I built my first Core i7 system 3.5 years ago, but I think my "high-end" Gigabyte MB is finally giving up (after slowly forcing me to replace functions, one at a time, through the years -- NO MORE GIGABYTE MBs for me!), so I'm looking at replacing it, and see NO sense in keeping that same 920 chip in a new MB, since I'll be getting one with SATA 3 AND USB 3 -- neither of which even existed when my current MB was built. At the time I built this system, I didn't really think about RAM timings (used all the same brand and speed, anyway, and will again), but I see ALL these differences and have NO IDEA what any of those numbers mean. I've actually got a bunch of stuff I can post in my own thread, if I can figure out how to start one again (I hadn't been here in so long I had to practically re-register).

    Help would be appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Jeff Hayes

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Georgia
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    Default

    Hi Jeff, sorry about the difficulties!

    but I think my "high-end" Gigabyte MB is finally giving up (after slowly forcing me to replace functions, one at a time, through the years
    I do not understand your above comment regards '. . . slowly forcing me to replace functions . . ". An electronic component can fail 'instantly' or it can fail due to 'one specific component failing slowly - initially - and then, rapidly to an 'inoperative state', thereby, rendering the mobo useless. When you say 'slowly forcing me to replace functions, one at a time' implies to me a partially bad or loose connection OR one stick of RAM having a 'partially defective component or bad connection' that causes problems from 'time to time'. RAM can fail slowly over a period of months but the 'RAM failure mode' gets worse with time or occurs more frequently as time goes on!

    If your computer is still operable, albeit, with problematic interruptions, you have a simple problem not a 'slowly failing component problem'.

    I've actually got a bunch of stuff I can post in my own thread, . . .
    If you want to post more info on the present problems, I will be glad to comment. In my writing the above, I am simply explaining my interpretation(s) of 'your description of your problem or continuing problems'.

    A computer that runs for intervals of some months and then has an 'occasional or intermittent' problem, but, nevertheless, continues to run for some years probably has a 'loose intermittent connection' or has a stick of RAM with one component slowing failing over time (but such a RAM problem 'consistently' gets worse over time - never better) and eventually shuts the computer down. But a RAM problem, as I described it, can take some months to 'fail to the point that you really get angry. My RAM failed as I have described but it took some months (maybe four to six months) to get to the point that I took action to replace the RAM, and, things have been fine since then.

    I think it would really be helpful if you would go ahead an post the history or problems that your (this) 'post" relates to!
    if I can figure out how to start one again
    Just keep going with this thread that you have already started!!
    Last edited by zburns; 10-16-2012 at 11:06 AM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    1,467

    Default

    My quote from the above 'thread reply':
    Just keep going with this thread that you have already started!!
    My mistake, the thread you were writing under was 'Uncle Paulty'. You need to start a new 'Thread'. You must register to start a thread or to reply to any thread (as your most recent post 'reply' today). Once you register, pick a topic to post your explanation under. 'Build Your Own PC' is the heading (topic) you should post under, since your problems relate to 'Building a PC".

    Click on 'Forum' at top of page, then click on 'Build Your Own PC' (at top of page), then click on 'Post New Thread' (at top of page) after clicking on 'Build Your Own PC'.
    Last edited by zburns; 10-16-2012 at 11:23 AM.

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