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Thread: FAT32 or NTSF?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Default FAT32 or NTSF?

    Well, my 2nd (RMA) mobo is scheduled to arrive tomorrow. Provided I get lucky and my build works this time, I may be installing WinXP this time tomorrow. When I format the new HD, which format should I use: FAT 32 or NTSF?

    It will be running XP home, used for games, video editing, and internet.

  2. #2
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    Dec 2007
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    Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
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    Default

    I do a lot of video work, so I have large files to store. FAT32 has a 4GB file size limitation, so I went with NTFS.

  3. #3
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    Jan 2008
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    Default

    I just read an article about fat32 and NTFS, but I still know very little about it.

    So just to get this straight, under Fat32 you cannot create a file bigger than 4gb or fat32 cannot even recognize files over 4gb?

    And not that it helps you boba without some reason behind it, but if you do a quick google search on fat32 and NTFS the few articles I saw all recommend NTFS for any newer system. The only apparent bonus fat32 might have is that it could be slightly faster, but none of the few articles I read had definitive evidence of that fact.

  4. #4
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    FAT32 is pretty old now, really all systems should be formatted with NTFS.

    The benefits are in this awesome thread i found http://www.pcreview.co.uk/forums/thread-74073.php

  5. #5
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    NTFS is the way to go, you get the most out of your HDD plus gain security benefits (such as permissions). It's been around for a long time and will continue to be around for a while.

    Just remember, you can't go back from NTFS to Fat32 - not that there would be any reason to do so.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    Question What about for dual-boot systems?

    Doesn't Microsoft explicitly state that if you plan to have a dual-boot system with Win98SE and WinXP (like what I'm trying to do) that you must use the FAT32 file system?

  7. #7
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    Only because Windows 98 doesn't support NTFS.

    Why are you trying to dual boot XP and 98? :/
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  8. #8
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    Feb 2008
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    I think that as long as the WIN98 partition is FAT32 and that the boot partition has XP installed then you can have that partition as NTFS.

    What I mean is that your NTFS partition can boot up both XP and 98, but the 98 O/S needs to be installed on FAT32.

    I would also ask why 98, but I figure that some apps are just not compatible with XP. Have you thought about virtualization? Using Virtual PC would allow you to install Win98 without having to dual boot.

  9. #9
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    Apr 2008
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    Post I'm living in the past...

    Actually, virtualization isn't something I had given any serious thought to, but I might consider it, given the hassle I'm finding myself in with my current plans. The reason I'm interested in being able to use Win 98 is, indeed, for the purpose of running older applications that simply will not function in the XP environment. Maybe someone could steer me in the right direction on how I can virtualize? Also, does it actually act as though you are operating out of the Windows 98 environment or just emulate its functions for some programs?

  10. #10
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    Will the programs not install on XP, or will they not run? Remember that you can run programs in Compatibility mode - just right click the executable, go to Properties, and click on the Compatibility tab. You should be able to set the execution parameters to that of Windows 98.

    Virtualization does make it seem as if you are using the Windows 98 environment, but it also provides easy interfaces with outside peripherals e.g. network connection. I have done a lot of virtualization in the past, especially with servers, and it definitely works. I even had Windows 3.1 running in a virtual environment.

    If you do decide to go down this route, then you may like to check out VMWare - it is a very good product.
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